1 February 2007

Special issue: Human resource development and management – in the Australian public and not for profit sector – new dynamics and new challenges

International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management 6(2/3/4) 2006 is a special issue: Human resource development and management – in the Australian public and not for profit sector – new dynamics and new challenges.
Article titles:
* The intensification of teachers' work and the role of changed public sector philosophy
* Extended working lives? The meaning of working to older university workers in Australia
* Performance appraisals in higher education: an Australian perspective
* Bringing the community in: possibilities for public sector union success through community unionism
* Leadership development in the military: bridging theory and practice
* Intellectual capital and strategic human resource management in social service non-profit organisations in Australia
* The importance of effective organisational relationships for nurses: a social capital perspective
* Profits before people: shifting customer and employee relations in Australian credit unions
* Predictors of employee extra-role performance and turnover intentions in the public sector: an integrated model
* Cultural tensions – exploring call centres in the public sector
* Courage, compromise or capitulation: human resource practitioners under ethical duress
* Applying a strategic international human resource management framework to international non-governmental organisations

2 comments:

finance clubinc said...

thanks for this article..

. . . with Len McGrane said...

I'm particularly interested in the section, 'Courage, compromise or capitulation: human resource practitioners under ethical duress'. It will never be easy to make good ethical decisions. But one thing that will help the staff of a HR department to do this will be a congenial, team atmosphere among the staff. If everyone is happy with each other works together confidently and well, there is less need to take politics into account when making ethical decisions. I mean, if the staff have become a team by, say, taking part in a good corporate team building program then it will be easier to make the right ethical decision. There should be no need to also be asking 'what is the best political decision here?' at that time. Right? Confidence in my colleagues goes a long way to getting good decisions from them, I think.