18 September 2019

What’s that smell?

Odours, scents, smells…whatever you call them, they are inextricably linked to our mood and memory. The delightful scent of a rose in bloom can evoke delicious emotions whereas a stench in the office can offend everyone and even disrupt work.

Olga Trhlíková of the Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry in Prague, Czech Republic, is using a powerful analytical technique that can home in on the source of a bad smell in the complex environment of a working office. She reports details of the technique, solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography, in the International Journal of Environmental Technology and Management.

“Permanent or recurring malodours invading office rooms have not only detrimental effects on the staff productivity but also on their health directly or through the stress mechanisms,” Trhlíková writes. Identifying the source of an offensive odour and removing or at least neutralizing it can be critical to office wellbeing. Solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometric (SPME/GC-MS) can identify previously unknown, but smelly volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an office whether the source is microbial spoilage and contamination, a chemical spill, or even fire.

The data from tests in four rooms of an office building were able to identify the malodours by matching the spectra and chromatograms to a database of known chemical fingerprints. In the proof of principle work, malodours from the most likely source, the lavatory, were ruled out quickly and the actual source of the bad smells turned out to be the rotting carcasses of dead animals within the building, such as small rodents.

Trhlíková, O. (2019) ‘Identification of the malodour source in a complex office environment using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography’, Int. J. Environmental Technology and Management, Vol. 22, Nos. 2/3, pp.115–127.

17 September 2019

Special Issue published: "Computational Intelligence and Deep Learning for Computer Vision"

International Journal of Computational Vision and Robotics 9(5) 2019

  • Attention-based argumentation mining
  • Segmentation and recognition of characters on Tulu palm leaf manuscripts
  • Combination of domain knowledge and deep learning for sentiment analysis of short and informal messages on social media
  • A real time aggressive human behaviour detection system in cage environment across multiple cameras
  • Exploring the effects of non-local blocks on video captioning networks
  • A novel approach for mitigating atmospheric turbulence using weighted average Sobolev gradient and Laplacian

Research pick: Getting better with age - "Inventory models for maturing and ageing items: cheese and wine storage"

Some things fade and deteriorate as they age, but not fine wine and cheese, many types of these products get better with maturity and their value goes up. In the world of logistics coping with products whose value changes with age is a conundrum for storage and transport.

A team from Italy, writing in the International Journal of Logistics Systems and Management, has looked in detail at this problem and come to some important conclusions for those handling and marketing maturing products.

Simone Zanoni, Lucio Enrico Zavanella, and Ivan Ferretti of the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the Università degli Studi di Brescia, in Brescia, point out that particular cheeses, red wines, but also spirits, balsamic vinegar, and other consumable goods have a particular set of peculiarities associated with aging and maturing and their growing value on the market.

Their work points to a new way to model product lifecycles, inventory and logistics in a way that was not considered in the original business models from the early part of the twentieth century where products were either seen as having an essentially “infinite” storage time or were perishable goods that had a limited shelf life.

Zanoni, S., Zavanella, L.E. and Ferretti, I. (2019) ‘Inventory models for maturing and ageing items: cheese and wine storage‘, Int. J. Logistics Systems and Management, Vol. 34, No. 2, pp.233-252.

13 September 2019

Research pick: Superficially satisfying spending - "Rich unboxing experiences: complexity in product packaging and its influence upon product expectations"

The overuse of packaging is a growing environmental problem in terms of resource use and waste production. Unfortunately, interesting and intriguing packaging is a crucial part of the modern approach to marketing and is perceived by many consumers, particularly those buying high-end goods, such as smartphones and other electronic gadgets as an essential part of the purchase experience.

The notion of a “rich unboxing experience” as infantile as that might sound is discussed in detail in the Journal of Design Research. Jieun Bae Busan of the National Science Museum in Busan, and James Self and Chajoong Kim of the Department of Industrial Design, at UNIST, in Ulsan, also in South Korea explore the influence of complexity in packaging design, defined as complexity of action and transformation, upon product appraisal at an unboxing phase of product life cycle.

Their surveillance of the market’s response to packaging reveals as one might expect that the complexity of product packaging significantly influences how the consumer appraises the product they have purchased and what might be described as the product’s “personality”. The findings contribute to a greater understanding of the role of packaging in increased expectations and delight as opposed to dissatisfaction, buyer’s remorse, one might say. The findings thus have implications for the use of complexity of action and transformation in product packaging design.

Unfortunately, it seems that the rich unboxing experience is probably here to stay at least for certain types of product unless companies and consumers can negotiate a position where satisfaction with a product is based solely on the product itself rather than the layers of wrappers in which it comes to the possession of the buyer.

Bae, J., Self, J.A. and Kim, C. (2019) ‘Rich unboxing experiences: complexity in product packaging and its influence upon product expectations‘, J. Design Research, Vol. 17, No. 1, pp.26-46.

12 September 2019

Research pick: Education hashtags on Twitter - "Analysing professional discourse on Twitter: a mixed methods analysis of the #openeducation hashtag"

New work published in the International Journal of Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments suggests how professional discourse might usefully be analysed on the micro-blogging platform known as Twitter.

Fredrick Baker of the Department of Instructional Design and Technology at the University of West Florida Patrick Lowenthal of Boise State University in Idaho explain how both professionals and academics now commonly use social networking sites such as Twitter for scholarly discourse around resources and networking. They point out that the use of so-called hashtags – keywords that are assigned a special searchable place within the Twitter system by virtue of adding a “hash, #” character (often known as the pound sign in the US) can be very useful for finding connections between users and related content.

In their work, they have looked at how education is discussed on Twitter by tracking and following the #openeducation hashtag. They used as a scalable mixed methods content analysis model to follow the discourse associated with this hashtag . They were able to analyse almost one thousand Twitter updates, or “tweets” and then group them according to themes. Thirty-two themes emerged from the analysis across eight main categories. They were than able to develop a questionnaire to survey users in a more informed manner and to reveal ties between users and connections within the information discussed that could might then be useful to those involved in open education in the broadest sense.
“The study shows that the hashtag is an active platform for connecting with others and sharing ideas, that open education designs and open educational content are the primary theme areas discussed on the #openeducation hashtag, and that the most active hashtag contributors are active voices in open education in a variety of ways,” the team concludes.

Baker III, F.W. and Lowenthal, P.R. (2019) ‘Analysing professional discourse on Twitter: a mixed methods analysis of the #openeducation hashtag‘, Int. J. Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments, Vol. 6, No. 2, pp.107-121.

World Review of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development to invite expanded papers from 2020 Vietnam Sustainability Forum (VSF-2020) for potential publication

Extended versions of papers presented at the 2020 Vietnam Sustainability Forum (VSF-2020) (23-24 March 2020, Hanoi, Vietnam) will be invited for review and potential publication by the World Review of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development.

11 September 2019

International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics increases issues

The International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics has announced that it will be increasing issues from four to six from 2020 onwards.

Free sample articles newly available from International Journal of Vehicle Noise and Vibration

The following sample articles from the International Journal of Vehicle Noise and Vibration are now available here for free:
  • Genetic and random search algorithms for optimising vehicle interior noise and vibration
  • Further proof for the theory of elastic sound absorption about flexible porous materials
  • Wind noise from A-pillar and side view mirror of a realistic generic car model, DriAver
  • Comparison of different tyre models for tyre/road noise applications
  • A nonlinear quarter-car active suspension design based on feedback linearisation and H∞ control

International Journal of Power Electronics increases issues

The International Journal of Power Electronics has announced that it will be increasing issues from four to eight from 2020 onwards.

Research pick: An antenna for detecting breast cancer - "Characterisation of breast tissue using compact microstrip antenna"

Breast cancer is a common illness around the world. It is the most common invasive of cancers in women and affects around one in eight and represents about a quarter of all invasive cancers.
A research team in India well aware of the issues, costs and discomfort surrounding screening and assessment of breast tumours with conventional mammography have developed a novel system for monitoring changes in such a tumour that uses a compact microstrip antenna. Such devices are relatively easy to fabricate and have a wide range of more conventional applications in the world of telecommunications as satellite television receivers and such.

The team describes details in the International Journal of Biomedical Engineering and Technology and explains how the devices comprise a radiating patch with a rectangular slot, three stubs, a feed-line and a partial ground plane. The devices operate at a frequency of between 2.4 and 4.76 gigahertz (microwave, or UH, ultrahigh frequencies) and measure the resonance of the tumour, as opposed to healthy breast, tissue, which have different dielectric properties.

The team reports how resonant frequency in the antenna falls as the tumour grows and rises if it shrinks due to treatment. This offers a relatively simple, non-surgical, and less risky way for the oncologist to monitor a tumour of the breast that is also more comfortable for the patient than standard measurement techniques.

Selvaraj, V., Srinivasan, P., Baskaran, D. and Krishnan, R. (2019) ‘Characterisation of breast tissue using compact microstrip antenna‘, Int. J. Biomedical Engineering and Technology, Vol. 31, No. 2, pp.161-175.

10 September 2019

International Journal of Management Practice increases issues

The International Journal of Management Practice has announced that it will be increasing issues from four to six from 2020 onwards.

Special issue published, in Memory of the Late Professor Emeritus Richard O. Goss

International Journal of Shipping and Transport Logistics 11(5) 2019

  • Goss and ensuing research in shipping and port
  • Port policy: are the Goss principles still relevant today?
  • Principles in practice: an examination of cascading
  • International port investment of Chinese port-related companies

Free sample articles newly available from International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation

The following sample articles from the International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation are now available here for free:
  • A quantitative assessment of variations in the palm surface area as a percentage of total body surface area within the general population
  • Driver response to steering perturbations: mechanical arm admittance and grip pressure
  • Ergonomic risk assessment in DHM tools employing motion data - exposure calculation and comparison to epidemiological reference data
  • Projection of anthropometric correlation for virtual population modelling
  • Predictive simulation of human circular gait

Research pick: Science and Star Wars - "Star Wars science on social media! Using pop culture to improve STEM skills"

Might popular culture, such as the Star Wars science fiction franchise be used to boost skills among those involved in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics)? Writing in the International Journal of Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments, Stephan Längle of the Danube University Krems in Austria discusses the possibility.

His study is based on the period 2000-2018 and focuses on Star Wars as one of the more enduring and well known of the science fiction franchises, It began in the late 1970s and still persists with a huge fan-base across all kinds of media, not just the original cinematic format. He points out that an increasing number of scientists use pop-cultural elements to communicate scientific theories and methods to the public and Star Wars is one of those. Längle suggests that learning through social media is on the increase among STEM students and the pop culture of Star Wars is successfully engaging many students in those areas.

The research suggests that there are two ways in which pop culture might be used in class: science principles might be communicated directly with reference to a fictional world, for instance, or the world might serve as a template for preparing teaching materials. Of course, some learners may not want to learn about the real science behind Star Wars and it may not be suitable for every class, some may be fans of Star Trek or another fictional world. Educators should, regardless, take into account the interests of their students and do so in a serious way so that those interests might be integrates into everyday school life in a positive way that improves learning.

Längle, S. (2019) ‘Star Wars science on social media! Using pop culture to improve STEM skills‘, Int. J. Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments, Vol. 6, No. 2, pp.137-149.

9 September 2019

International Journal of Management in Education increases issues

The International Journal of Management in Education has announced that it will be increasing issues from four to six from 2020 onwards.

Inderscience journals to invite expanded papers from International Conference on Sustainable Developmental Goals and Management Practices in Tourism & Hospitality Sector (SDGMP 2019) for potential publication

Extended versions of papers presented at the International Conference on Sustainable Developmental Goals and Management Practices in Tourism & Hospitality Sector (SDGMP 2019) (1-2 November 2019, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab, India) will be invited for review and potential publication by the following journals:

International Journal of Energy Technology and Policy increases issues

The International Journal of Energy Technology and Policy has announced that it will be increasing issues from four to six from 2020 onwards.

Special issue published: "Emerging Trends In Computer Applications In Technology"

International Journal of Computer Applications in Technology 61(1/2) 2019

  • Cooperative evaluation mechanism based on the optimal decision of DE-CA-CR
  • Improved data envelopment analysis model based on geometric mean model
  • Improved face recognition with accelerated robust features improved by means of mean shift k-means clustering
  • Analysis of system implementation effect based on Bayes analysis of imbalanced measures
  • Effect of cognitive need and purchase involvement on information processing in the online shopping decision-making
  • Analysis and prediction of autistic children's game characteristics
  • Development mode of circular economy industrial cluster based on game theory
  • Community discovery method based on complex network of data fusion based on super network perspective
  • Relay protection method based on decentralised control logic based on two side active excitation detection
  • A dynamic modelling method for dynamic wireless charging system of electric vehicles based on dual LCL non-resonant compensation
  • An image segmentation algorithm based on combination of slope width reduction and cross cortical model
  • A comprehensive evaluation model based on fuzzy meta-association rules
  • A risk preference model for teaching resource allocation based on functional link fuzzy neural network algorithm classifier
  • Collaborative sparse unmixing using variable splitting and augmented Lagrangian with total variation
  • Fusion algorithm for information interaction control of multi-UAVs based on intelligent algorithm
  • Computer-based outdoor sport sustainable development using wavelet neural network
  • Design of extensible multi-source signal acquisition device based on DSP and STM32
  • Design and implementation of LTE physical layer on FPGA
  • Innovation mechanism of cluster industry based on weighted time-varying multi-criteria and similarity evaluation method